Disaster

It is vital that our industrialised nations seek urgently to develop practicable and renewable sources of energy, not as some imaginary counter-measure to global warming, but because of the threat posed by growing competition for rapidly depleting resources.

Such is our inflated notion of ourselves that when we refer to the dangers of global warming or nuclear warfare, we talk of running the risk of destroying the planet.

Humans are not capable of destroying the planet. However, we do run a real risk of destroying ourselves (and whatever other species we happen to bring down with us). If man were to disappear completely, the planet would keep trundling along as it has always done.

He’s right, of course. Imagine, if the world was convulsed in deadly cataclysms, and you find yourself clinging to a lump of advertising hoarding amid a sea of filthy water after a tsunami had struck Dublin. Sound awful? Now try imagining the same thing, only this time you’re thinking ‘Holy shit! I remember reading an Irish Times article about this by David Adams!’

It doesn’t bear thinking about.

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2 Responses to “Disaster”


  1. 1 EWI September 25, 2008 at 3:56 pm

    It is vital that our industrialised nations seek urgently to develop practicable and renewable sources of energy, not as some imaginary counter-measure to global warming, but because of the threat posed by growing competition for rapidly depleting resources.

    Such is our inflated notion of ourselves that when we refer to the dangers of global warming or nuclear warfare, we talk of running the risk of destroying the planet.

    Humans are not capable of destroying the planet.

    What I’m thinking is: “Holy shit, now we’ve got another a–hole joining John Reveille in glbal warming denialism in the IT.” But, I guess the guy is from Ireland’s Bible Belt… (cf Wilson, Sammy)

  2. 2 Hugh Green September 25, 2008 at 4:49 pm

    I don’t know if he is denying the existence of global warming, I think his point is that it hardly matters if global warming is anthropogenic or not, since the world will probably be destroyed one way or another (which may indicate a denialist standpoint, I suppose). And I tend to agree with his point that humans are not capable of destroying the planet, to the extent that the lump of rock orbiting the sun will most likely be here long after we are all gone. But there’ll be no-one around to prove it, so it will no longer matter anyway.

    Not sure if either he or Sammy are of a biblical inclination, but I get the feeling that Sammy Wilson is about as religious as I am.

    I guess what I’m really wondering is: what does a former UDP councillor of modest writing ability have to say of interest on global warming to the Irish Times readership? Is there some sort of radical chic thang going on that I don’t know about?


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